Amala Groom and Nicole Monks

 

Amala Groom and Nicole Monks work both independently and collaboratively as multi- disciplinary arts practitioners. Together their collaborative practice acts as a performance of their cultural sovereignty; creatively expressed through the meetings of new technologies and ancient knowledge’s. Their work is focused on exploring the indivisibility of the human experience and asserts the embodiment of the ‘living mirror’ that exists as the Aboriginal experience – reflecting the mirror across contemporary society so that others may see themselves in the artists.

Amala Groom is a Wiradjuri conceptual artist whose practice, as the performance of her cultural sovereignty, is informed and driven by First Nations epistemologies, ontologies and methodologies. Her work, a form of passionate activism, presents acute and incisive commentary on contemporary socio-political issues. Articulated across diverse media, Groom’s work often subverts and unsettles western iconographies in order to enunciate Aboriginal stories, experiences and histories, and to interrogate and undermine the legacy of colonialism. Not wishing to create reactionary works which tacitly allow contemporary political operatives serving the colonial ideology to set her artistic agenda, Groom seeks to create works which proactively and creatively unpack and undermine the Colonial Project, the on-going philosophy of colonialism that has imperialistically subjugated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples since 1770.

Nicole Monks is a trans-disciplinary artist of Yamatji Wajarri, Dutch and English heritage. Monks is informed by her cross-cultural identity and her work takes its focus from storytelling, as a way to connect the past with the present and future. Her designs take a conceptual approach, often embedded with narratives, and aim to promote cross-cultural understanding and communication. A designer by trade, Monks crosses artforms to work with furniture and objects, textiles, video, installation and performance. Across these varied forms of contemporary art and design, her work reflects Aboriginal philosophies of sustainability, innovation and collaboration. With adeptness and sensitivity, Monk’s practice weaves together Aboriginal history and philosophy with contemporary Western thought and resonates with a wide Australian audience.